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This surgeon says he can increase your penis size by two inches by injecting it with blood

It’s really not about length. It’s about what you do with it.

But despite this knowledge being spread far and wide, many men are still bothered by the size of their penis – judging by the Google searches for ‘how to make my penis bigger’, anyway.

So of course, surgeons are stepping up to meet the demand, creating procedures that they claim will make men’s dicks larger.

They’re probably more effective than the herbal teas recommended all over the internet, to be fair.

Dr Norman Rowe, a surgeon in New York, has just debuted a new technique for boosting men’s genitals.

Essentially, it’s a bit like those vampire facials everyone got excited about when Kim Kardashian shared a bloody-faced selfie. You pop into the surgery, get your own blood injected into your genitals, and, apparently, can expect a growth of 1.5 inches in circumference.*

*Yep. We’re talking girth, not length.

Dr Rowe told Daily Mail Online that the procedure lasts just 10 minutes and there’s no need for a recovery period. You can get the procedure done in your lunch break and go straight back to work. If you fancy.

The only after-effect you need to worry about is accidentally disrupting the symmetry of the injection. Dr Rowe recommends skipping sex for two days post-op.

The procedure is a pretty big deal, as it’s the first time someone’s come up with a way to enlarge the penis without surgery.

Dr Rowe was inspired to create the treatment by the rise of quick fix procedures like Botox and fillers, and wondering if something similar could work for penises.

He then looked into a method often used in sports medicine, which involves injecting blood back into the body to revive the muscle, and the vampire facial.

And voila: he came up with his bulge booster, which he claims can remedy erectile dysfunction alongside increasing girth.

Which all sounds wonderful, if girth is something you’re worried about.

But would you dare to get multiple injections in your dick? Could you actually go through with it? We’re crossing our legs and cringing a little at the thought.

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Sexualized Children: Assessment and Treatment of Sexualized Children and Children Who Molest

Abstract:

The authors provide preliminary information based on their combined experience in working with children 12 years old and under who have sexually molested others or who have exhibited problematic sexual behaviors. Chapters also discuss age-appropriate childhood sexuality and provide a way to distinguish "normal sex play" from problematic sexual behaviors. Separate chapters address clinical evaluation, individual therapy, group therapy, family treatment, out-of- home care, and transference and countertransference. The authors advise that sexually abusive behavior by children stems from and affects attachment to parents and peers, creates disregulation in behavior and affect, and disturbs the child's developing sense of self. Effective therapy should focus on developmental issues, relational attachment, emotional/behavioral regulation, and development of self. Appendixes discuss the frequency of sexual behaviors and discriminating items, the testing of children with problematic sexual behaviors, and additional issues related to the goals of group therapy. Appendixes also provide a child sexual behavior checklist, a child sexual behavior inventory, and youthful offenders' family assessment form.

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Men risk their lives in wars so women can enjoy societies where they can pursue feminist goals, such as punishing men for sexist language.

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A Controversial Procedure To Restore The Clitoris After FGM

When Kiki was nine years old, in Guinea, she thought she was being taken to buy some Play-Doh. Instead, she was taken to a stranger’s house and forced to undergo a procedure known as female genital mutilation (FGM), sometimes referred to as female genital cutting. Over 200 million women around the world have undergone FGM, but Kiki is one of only a few thousand who have attempted to surgically reverse its effects, electing to have a so-called clitoral restoration surgery.

The restorative surgery is seemingly a godsend for women who unwittingly underwent FGM as children — offering the chance to both physically restore sensation and also the opportunity to reclaim their own sexuality. But the procedure is not without controversy. Because the surgery is relatively new, and therapy can help with psychological issues, not all experts are convinced that surgery is the best option for FGM victims in the long-term. Further complicating the conversation around the procedure is the fact that one of its largest proponents is a new religion that believes extraterrestrials engineered life on Earth. (More on that later.)

In Kiki’s home country of Guinea, FGM is traditional—70 percent of women in the country aged 20 to 24 were cut before age 10. And although her mother’s family, devoutly Muslim, didn’t approve of the practice, the women on her father’s side encouraged it.

On the day of her FGM, her aunt took her to a stranger’s house. “The next thing I knew, I was jumped on,” Kiki, whose name has been changed for this story, recalls to Vocativ. “When you feel like someone is about to harm you, you want to run. I tried to take off, they circled me, next thing I knew I was on the ground.” Kiki was taken to the backyard. One woman sat on her chest, making it hard to breathe, while another two women pulled her legs apart. Kiki recalls being overcome by pain and fear; at some point during the procedure, she says, she lost consciousness.

In the immediate aftermath of cutting, women can feel severe pain, bleeding or have infections; in the long term, they might have pain during urination, menstruation, or intercourse; buildup of scar tissue; and psychological problems like depression or post-traumatic stress disorder.

Now Kiki lives in Indiana, having graduated not long ago from university there. When she first tried to have sex in college, it was painful. She could have an orgasm, but “it was a struggle…it would take a while,” she says. Her friends would talk about their great sex lives, and she would just listen, nodding. “‘Why are you so quiet?’ they would ask me. And I would say, ‘Well, what do you want me to say?’”

A few years ago, she heard about clitoral restoration and set out on a path that would ultimately change her relationship to sex and to her own identity.

On a physical level, the goal of clitoral restoration is to reduce pain and restore lost sensation to women’s genitals. On an abstract level, it can help victims of FGM take ownership of their identity and sexuality.

FGM is a catch-all term that refers to a range of procedures, from the entire removal of the external part of the clitoris (clitorectomy) to “nicking” the clitoris but leaving it intact. There are lots of reasons why cultures continue to perform FGM, but it’s no coincidence that it involves the organ that is the nexus of much of a woman’s sexual pleasure. “In some cultures, women are told that if they don’t cut the clitoris, it will be big or make a woman hypersexual so that she will not be marriageable,” says Jasmine Abdulcadir, a gynecologist at Geneva University Hospitals in Switzerland, where she runs a clinic for victims of FGM.

But, much like an iceberg, only a small percentage of the clitoris is visible outside the body. So even if the visible part has been nicked or removed, as is the case among women who fit into the first two classes of FGM, there’s more tissue inside the body. To perform a clitoral restoration procedure, the surgeon slices open the area around where the clitoral tissue would typically exit the body, and simply pulls down the existing tissue, fastening it to the surrounding tissues to keep it in place.

“When I go to reconstruct clitorises where there has been cutting, the clitoris is always there 100 percent of the time. There’s no question it’s still there,” says Marci Bowers, an OBGYN who has performed more than 200 clitoral restoration procedures. “In fact, in one third of cases where I operate, the clitoris is completely intact. There’s nothing missing. It’s just covered in a web of scar tissue.”

The surgery itself takes less than an hour and is done under anesthesia. The recovery usually takes a few months.

First performed in Egypt 2006, clitoral restoration procedures truly started to gain traction in 2012, when French surgeon Pierre Foldes published a study for which he performed the procedure on nearly 3,000 women. A year after the operation, Foldes followed up with about 30 percent of the patients, and found that most of them had reduced pain and increased sensation in the clitoris. Half had even experienced an orgasm.

The results were a sensation, sparking interest among other surgeons and patients alike, plus kicking off a flurry of stories in the popular press.

Today there are a handful of surgeons running clinics scattered across the world—Geneva, Burkina Faso, San Francisco—who know how to perform the clitoral restorations. One of the biggest orchestrators is a Las Vegas-nonprofit called Clitoraid. The organization was founded in the philosophy of the Raelian Movement, a religion with followers that believe that human extraterrestrials engineered and synthesized DNA to create all life on Earth. Rael, the founder of the religion, reportedly saw first-hand what effects FGM can have on women during a visit to West Africa in 2003, according to a Clitoraid press officer.

In Raelism, pleasure is an important way to connect to the extraterrestrial creators, and FGM works counter to that mission. “When barbaric traditions cut off the clitoris of little girls, not only do they violate their right to body integrity as children, but they also violate their very right to feel mentally and emotionally balanced and harmonious throughout their lives,” the press officer told Vocativ in an email.

Clitoraid now mostly serves to raise awareness for FGM and to foster connections for clitoral restoration procedures—between surgeons so that they can be trained to perform them, between victims of FGM and doctors to do the surgery.

That’s how Kiki found out about the clitoral restoration procedure. When she came to the U.S. for college, she was evaluated by a doctor who suggested that Kiki look into it. “Since I’m a curious person, I started doing research online,” Kiki says. She contacted Clitoraid and, in early 2015, she hopped on a plane to meet Harold Henning, one of the two surgeons in the country performing the procedure at the time (and the only one who is also Raelian). Kiki didn’t pay anything for the surgery itself, she says—just her plane ticket and the $500 hospital fee. She knew about the organization’s connection to Raelism, but it wasn’t pushed on her; she doesn’t remember ever talking about it with Henning.

Kiki’s recovery went quickly and within a few months she was totally healed. Now, more than a year later, she says you can’t even tell she had surgery. And It’s been a game-changer for her sex life: “I was not feeling much pleasure. Now it’s completely different,” she says.

If the effects of FGM were only physical — or if all cases were as straightforward as Kiki’s — experts would likely recommend the procedure unequivocally. But FGM is much more complex than that. The surgery comes with risks, things like infection and complications. And, even if it goes according to plan, it might not address the psychological issues like fear of intimacy.

Abdulcadir, who runs the clinic in Geneva, has the training to perform the surgery, but she considers it a last resort. Of the approximately 15 women who come to her clinic every month, only about 20 percent ask for the surgery (the rest are seeking help due to pregnancy or complications from FGM). Those that do want the surgery spend three months meeting with psychiatrists and sex therapists, and receiving education about their own anatomy, before the surgery is a possibility. “Once they start to know how their bodies work, how their anatomy and clitoris are, the majority of them do not go for surgery—their needs are met by counseling and education,” Abdulcadir says.

Part of the reason for this is that Abdulcadir has reservations about the long-term effects of the procedure. Foldes, in his seminal study, followed up with less than a third of the patients, and only after a year. “What happens after five years? After 10? When a woman changes partners or when she has kids? We’ve had studies about clitoral restoration procedures,” Abdulcadir says, “But now we need good, quality studies with long-term follow-ups.”

This lack of long-term data is part of the reason that the World Health Organization, in the recently-published guidelines about FGM (of which Abdulcadir was one of the collaborators), stated that there’s not yet enough evidence to wholeheartedly recommend the procedure.

Mariya Karimjee, a freelance writer based in Karachi, Pakistan who has publicly discussed her experience of being cut and its effects on her as an adult, says she thought about the surgery when she first heard about Foldes’ study. She brought it up with her doctor, but he didn’t sound totally convinced by the science, Karimjee recalls, in part because there wasn’t enough long-term follow-up.

Eventually, she gave up on the idea of the surgery. “I wanted an easy fix, to undo the damage,” Karimjee says. “It sounds appealing. But at this point in my life I don’t know that it really is a quick fix.” It would take months for the skin to regrow, and it would be painful. “I don’t need any more pain.”

Bowers and Henning, both of whom perform the surgery primarily on patients from Clitoriad, agree that counseling is important, but believe the surgery is as well. The procedure is medically sound, Bowers says, but “the question is, psychologically, is it worthwhile? You don’t want to re-traumatize someone.” She recommends sex therapy to many of her patients after the surgery.

Henning believes that all people could benefit from sex therapy, “but that’s not criteria for surgery,” he says. “Most of these women have lived with this for many years. They have already had all the experiences they’re going to have with sexuality beforehand.”

For her part, Bowers is disappointed by WHO’s cautionary approach in recommending the restoration procedure. “It does need to be evidence-based, there’s a healthy reason for that. But what they’ve said, that’s really misinformation. All it takes is to hear one personal account of someone having the first orgasm in their life to say there’s no more evidence needed. This works.”

There’s certainly no one-size-fits-all solution for how women deal with the effects of FGM. Karimjee plans to find a sex therapist—“I would rather figure out if there’s a psychological trauma, and do that hard work. Even if I had surgery I would probably need that,” she says.

But for Kiki, who has never seen a therapist and has no plans to do so in the near future, the procedure was enough to restore her sexual function.

More importantly, the surgery make her feel like whole self. “Someone took something away from me that they were not entitled to. They did it just for the sake of it, out of cruelty,” Kiki says. “Now I got that back.”

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Lolicon Backlash in Japan

There has been significant public outcry in Japan following the kidnapping and murder of an elementary school girl in Nara, Japan and the arrest of a suspected lolicon for the crimes.

CASPAR, a Japanese non-profit-organization founded in 1989, is campaigning for regulation regarding the depiction of of minors in pornographic magazines and adult video games. Caspar states that it has been collecting sample material for several years.

Caspar founder Kondo Mitsue states, "For 5 or 6 years we have been collecting material, and the so called bishoujo adult anime magazines and bishoujo adult anime simulation games are terrible. Grown men manipulate childlike little girls, themes of turning them into slaves to have one's own sexual desires fulfilled being very common. "

According to Kondo the characters of these games and magazines are often clearly meant to be elementary aged school-children.

Producers of the lolicon and bishoujo material often argue that the Japanese constitution guarantees their freedom of expression in this matter and that laws restricting these materials would be unconstitutional. Kondo however counters this stating that "The utmost priority of the constitution is to guarantee fundamental human rights. I believe the freedom of expression does not allow for the depiction of little girls being violently raped, depriving them of their basic human rights."

She states that there is no country in the world that pays as little attention to Child Pornography as Japan.

CASPAR has collected 7,000 signatures on a petition to have the Japanese legal code revised in respect to virtual child pornography. In addition, 16 member of the Diet and several members of congress have pledged to support such measures.

Kondo founded CASPAR in 1989 after learning of the child prostitution issues in Thailand. The organization has built around 20 schools for children in Thailand and the Philippines. It was officially recognized as a legal non-profit-organization in 2003 and has 770 members nationwide. CASPAR believes that child prostitution and child pornography have common roots and that by regulating child pornography, the fight against child prostitution will be aided.

In 2002 the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a 6-year-old law banning virtual child pornography. The subsequent "Child Obscenity and Pornography Prevention Act of 2002 banned only virtual images that are indistinguishable from real child porn, and prohibits all obscene pornographic images of prepubescent children.

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Lingerie model gets 'designer vagina' after REFUSING doctor's advice to grow her bikini line out

A lingerie model has gone under the knife to get a "designer vagina" to resolve a painful problem with her genitals.

Tracy Kiss, 29, endured pain every single day, whether she was walking along the street, working out or even sitting down.

The single mother-of-two was left fearing she had "deformed" genitals, but a doctor told her the problem was down to excess skin and recommended growing her pubic hair out.

Tracy, who opened up about the problem on 5STAR's Don't Tell The Doctor, chose to undergo surgery instead as she feared the look would not go down well in the modelling world.

Seeking the advice of Doctor Belinda Fenty on the new show, the Buckinghamshire native revealed how she feared her vagina was "deformed".

Speaking to the doctor, who works in gynaecology and antenatal medicine, at her home, Tracy explained how the intimate issue affected her - saying she often had to awkwardly adjust herself in public to try and alleviate the pain.

After attempting to self-diagnose using the web, the model admitted that she had been left scared after viewing a string of responses, choosing instead to seek a definitive answer.

"I’ve only seen [my vagina] when I took a photo to see where the pain was coming from, I was so surprised really in the difference in size and shape and it looks like it’s deformed," she told the programme.

"I think I have excess skin, but I don’t know what to compare it to see how much."

But Doctor Fenty put her fears to rest as she explained the cause of the pain following an examination.

The medical professional told Tracy: "It does not look deformed. The left side looks bigger than the right side, but that is absolutely within the normal range but that’s probably what’s giving you your problem.

"I can see that your inner lips are hanging lower than your outer lips, that is definitely what it going to be causing your problems."

Reassuring the model that she wasn't suffering from any abnormalities, the doctor suggested that Tracy grow out her bikini line to provide a bit of cushioning.

"'I do lingerie modelling and I don’t know how well that would go down," explained Tracy.

"I already think I have quite a big bulge in the skin and think if I have a big bush of hair it would look quite obvious in lingerie."

Choosing instead to take a more drastic approach to solving her issue, she opted to undergo a labiaplasty.

The procedure, also known as vulval surgery, involves the removal of excess skin from the vagina lips.

Heading to eminent cosmetic and reconstructive surgeon Angelica Kavouni's Harley street clinic, Tracy went under the knife.

Staying awake for the procedure, Tracy had a local anaesthetic, while the surgeon seared off the small piece of flesh that had been negatively affecting her.

Despite the painful post-op recovery period, the hopeful model said: "I will get my life back and it's more than worth it."

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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'Paedophile hunter' feels no guilt for Harlow man's suicide following online grooming sting

A self-styled paedophile paedophile hunter says he feels no guilt over the suicide of a man caught on camera allegedly attempting to meet up with a 14-year-old girl.

Christopher Wood, who goes by the name of Catfish the Hunter to ensnare suspected sex offenders and groomers, has come under criticism for his actions after the death of Harlow man Terry Hurford.

Posing as a teenage girl online, Mr Wood says Mr Hurford agreed to meet what he thought was a young girl.

Mr Hurford took his own life three days after being arrested on suspicion of grooming.

"I see what I do as a duty," said Mr Wood.

"I meet the people and upload the videos so that other people can see what these guys are doing and so they can keep their children away from them.

"I know that what I'm doing is 100 per cent within the law but a lot of people think it is morally wrong.

"My heart is in the right place and I'm trying to do some good."

Mr Wood, a 23-year-old father-of-two, first created his fake profile as a 14-year-old girl just four months ago, following a move from Yorkshire to Essex.

He adopted the alias of Catfish the Hunter and quickly amassed a large social media following.

"The area I moved into wasn't the nicest," he added.

"I have got two young children myself and at first, I would let them play out a bit, but quickly, I had a lot of people telling me to be extremely careful because a lot of sex offenders got released back into that area.

"In Huddersfield, I felt safe where I lived and never had any of these concerns, but in a completely new place with all these rumours, I tried to do some research.

"There was nothing at all I could find about convicted sex offenders and we as parents, have a right to know who we should be safe-guarding our children from.

"I could become friends with my next door neighbour and they could be a sex offender without me knowing."

Mr Wood took to patrolling chat websites and dating site Badoo in the hope of attracting predators, but is adamant that what he is doing is not entrapment, and he always waits for the man to make the first move.

"Badoo is an over-18s website, and obviously a lot of people would say that children would not go on something for over-18s, but it's totally false.

"When I have been on there, one or two of every ten people you come across would be 14 or 15.

"You have to be 18 to smoke or to drink, but children do that underage, and there is no security on those websites at all.

"The guys will always ask me questions first, and I will reply."

While he currently estimates that he is in conversation with up to 20 men, some of them "for weeks and weeks at a time", by far his most high-profile case was that of Mr Hurford, who was filmed meeting Catfish after driving from Harlow to Canvey Island in the early hours of the morning, allegedly planning to meet a 14-year-old girl.

He was at arrested at the scene on suspicion of grooming when police were called to Thorney Bay Caravan Park in Canvey Island.

Three days later, after being released on bail, he hanged himself.

And while Mr Wood sympathises with the 44-year-old's family – and two young children – he stands by his controversial methods.

"I have had people on the Facebook page calling me a murderer, saying I should be hanged," he added.

"I really do feel sorry for his family, but I don't feel like I'm guilty for whatever happened to him and what I'm doing is with a good heart.

"I didn't instigate the messages, I didn't instigate the meeting, and I didn't instigate his suicide.

"As much as I never comprehended anything like this happening, I hold myself to the highest professional standards I possibly can.

"I feel awful for his two children; I have children myself and I can't comprehend how difficult it will be for them growing up without a father."

Two videos of their encounter, in which Mr Wood questions Mr Hurford on his intentions and relays their online conversations, were uploaded to the internet on May 28.

And since Mr Hurford's death, Chris took to the Catfish page to hold an online question-and-answer session in an attempt to justify his actions.

"He drove miles from Harlow in the totally opposite direction to meet up with a 14-year-old girl," he said.

"Why would he drive 40 minutes out of the way to meet someone who he didn't know? He wanted to make sure that it was a real girl he was meeting up with.

"I can't say for sure what he was going to do, but I know what I believe he was going to do.

"What bothers me is when people come on Facebook and comment, when they have only heard the wrong side of the story.

"I want closure so the family can have some closure.

"What happened was a tragedy but Terry had problems.

"His death has made me think long and hard about what I'm doing. I don't feel any guilt over what happened, but I certainly don't want it to happen again.

"What happened with Terry Hurford really shocked me, but I do believe I'm what I'm doing and what I'm saying."

While he has vowed to carry on seeking to expose alleged sex offenders across the county, Chris, who lives in Canvey Island, is willing to make some concessions to avoid a similar scenario unfolding in the future.

"I'm going to keep on uploading the videos but I will blur the faces until they have been through the courts and been found guilty," he said.

"The police are bound by red tape and entrapment laws so I'm not going to stop doing what I'm doing; I'm not doing anything illegal or wrong.

"When I was 14, if anyone wanted to contact me, they would ring my home phone or come and knock on my door, so my parents knew exactly who I was speaking to.

"Now, 12 and 13-year-olds are on the internet so anyone in the world can influence that child, with grooming or indecent messages or images."

Mr Hurford's family declined to comment when they were approached by the Chronicle's sister paper, The Harlow Star.

Essex Police is investigating Mr Hurford's death. Enquiries are ongoing to see if any "third parties" committed any offences.

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Ray J’s Comments About A Certain Part Of Kim Kardashian’s Body May Earn Him A Kanye Twitter Rant

Kanye West tore Wiz Khalifa a new one when he thought the Pittsburgh rapper was “coming out the side of his neck” and speaking ill on wife Kim Kardashian. Turns out, Wiz wasn’t, and the two have since made amends. But one can only imagine the epic Twitter rant Kanye’s going to go on after Ray J said his wife’s “ridiculous” vaginal odor acted as an “unbearable” penis repellent when they were together.

The R&B singer, who co-starred alongside Kim in Kim K Superstar and dated for three years in 2003, claims in a new interview that Mrs. West’s pH balance was so off at one point that he had to seek medical attention. “I went to the doctor and asked the doctor, ‘Is it me? Check me first. Okay, I’m good? What’s up with my girlfriend’s coochie?,’ ” he recalls in the interview that’ll surely piss Kanye off. “It’s ridiculous!”

Ray J says his doctor advised him to simply tell his then-girlfriend that her vagina “smells bad,” but he was so afraid of having the talk that he asked him to make the call instead. “C’mon, doc. You gotta give me something else. Can you call her because I can’t take this anymore.” The “One Wish” singer eventually found the courage to tell the reality star his concerns, which resulted in Kim immediately getting her problem fixed. “When I told Kim K, that was it. The next day, the p**** was fresh.”

The singer suspects Kim’s vaginal issues may have stemmed from her choice of clothing, or perhaps an STD, saying: “Most of the time it’s a yeast infection. A lot of the times, girls wear thongs with colors on them and it f**ks up something down there and brings about an odor [it messes with the pH]. Sometimes, the p***y stinks. Sometimes, you got an STD. Most of the times, when guys think p***y stinks, they think STD [and] dirty p***y.”

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